Category: Review

Music

Sia’s film, Music, found itself ensnared in controversy months before it debuted thanks to a snappy remark from its creator: “Maybe you’re just a bad actor”. She lashed out at autistic viewers who were begging her to explain why she cast her dancer/protege/stand-in Maddie Ziegler in the role of Music, a character on the spectrum.…

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Bliss

When I clicked on Amazon’s latest original movie, I thought I was tuning into an odd romantic comedy that also somehow involved parallel dimensions. The cast certainly looked promising, as did the titillating first trailer. This grey-toned, deadpan dystopian drama is quite the unexpected surprise. Not necessarily in quality, but in the amount of thought…

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How it Ends

Sundance Film Festival has long been known for its notorious quirkiness. Often programming American indie films from a wealthy, nepotistic scene, filmmakers like Miranda July got started at American indie’s largest festival. Past the 2000s Golden Era of twee, it lives on through a millennial BuzzFeed style humor, much to the chagrin of many. This…

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Malcolm & Marie

[written by Ryan N.] Rolled out as a dramatic love story in its first trailer many people, myself included, gave little attention to the fact that Sam Levinson was the mind behind the film. It would be absurd to think the guy who made Assassination Nation, an ultraviolent Japanese-style girl boss movie tackling social media hysteria,…

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Saint Maud

If nothing else, Saint Maud is notable on this site for being layered and compelling enough that I had the drive to actually get this review submitted in a timely manner. Maybe it’s because I want to strike while the iron is hot, while the final moments of the film have branded themselves onto my…

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Judas and the Black Messiah

What I have had to relearn about the 1960s as a decade in American politics has been infinite. I was taught the usual schtick in elementary school – Dr. King good, violence bad. In high school I remember reading Malcolm X’s essay “Learning to Read.” Thinking about it all these years later I should have…

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The Little Things

Pitched in 1993 by writer/director John Lee Hancock only to be met with apprehension for being too dark, The Little Things is now upon us. The 1990’s setting has gone from contemporary to a period piece, and the dynamic of the lead trio is just different enough from that of Se7en to set itself apart.…

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Spontaneous

It’s Christmas Eve, and I’m sitting here, watching and writing about Spontaneous, the only 2020 movie I currently have in my collection (until morning, when my mother opens the copy of Bill & Ted Face the Music I got her). And I didn’t even buy this copy. It was signed and sent to me by…

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Locked Down

In less than a year, the Zoom ring sound takes me out of a movie more than a Wilhelm scream does. My adverse reaction to this isn’t Locked Down’s fault, as the wave of movies directly inspired by 2020 and the COVID-19 pandemic have already begun to creep onto our screens with titles like Host,…

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Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom

This year has brought us a lot of unexpected and amazing films, but I don’t think Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom is arriving with low expectations. As the final performance on film from Chadwick Boseman and a continuation of August Wilson adaptations following Fences, the latest Netflix original has been gathering buzz for quite some time.…

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